Healthy Sweet Potato Butternut Casserole

Combining sweet potatoes, butternut squash, maple syrup and a pinch of cinnamon and curry, this healthy sweet potato casserole wows everyone!

Combining the wonderful flavors of sweet potatoes, butternut squash and maple syrup, this one wows everyone!

You know what’s fascinating to me? How traditional Thanksgiving feasts vary tremendously from family to family, as well as from one area of the country to another.

Both Scott and I grew up in central Wisconsin. A typical Thanksgiving dinner for us included turkey, mashed potatoes, gravy and cranberry sauce. You’d also find sweet potatoes, corn, a green veggie and some type of yeast rolls on the table. When we moved to North Carolina, we discovered that, what was “typical” for us, wasn’t really typical at all!

When Thanksgiving rolled around the first few times in North Carolina, I experienced a bit of a shock. I learned from new friends at work and in the neighborhood that a classic southern Thanksgiving meal was quite different from my norm. To start with, there were usually several types of meat, minimally a ham and a turkey. The sides often included dishes that, to me, seemed a bit weird. Some of my friends talked about deviled eggs, mac cheese, pickles and collard greens! Other typical feasts included pimento cheese, corn bread stuffing, corn puddings, biscuits and grits.

MY OTHER RECIPES


“What is wrong with these people?” was the first thought from this narrow-minded midwestern girl. It took a bit of time, but I finally came to understand that there are lots of wonderfully, delicious ways to celebrate Thanksgiving. These days, I love hearing about “typical” Thanksgiving feasts, knowing there are a zillion unique traditions and beloved culinary customs. Did you know that in Baltimore and parts of Pennsylvania, a Thanksgiving meal without sauerkraut is quite unthinkable? Now that’s my kind of tradition! (Not so much the photographer’s though!)

Combining sweet potatoes, butternut squash, maple syrup and a pinch of cinnamon and curry, this Healthy Sweet Potato Butternut Casserole wows everyone! www.thecafesucrefarine.com

Although there are lots of unique variations, a few things are quite universal for Thanksgiving meals, here in the States. For example, it doesn’t matter where you go in the country, turkey is a given, as well as some type of pumpkin or pecan pie. Sweet potatoes are another endearing tradition; usually in the form of a casserole. Traditional recipes for sweet potato casseroles include a marshmallow or brown sugar pecan topping. And the sweet potatoes inside are usually sweetened to the point of being dessert-worthy.

Marshmallows and sugar aren’t necessary for deliciousness

This season, I’m happy to present a new option; a delicious, but healthy sweet potato casserole. Intrigued by a recipe I saw on Pinterest, I couldn’t resist checking it out. Happy to see that the ingredient list didn’t include marshmallow or sugar, I adapted the recipe to make it a bit easier (no peeling and dicing the squash) and added a few touches of my own.

Combining sweet potatoes, butternut squash, maple syrup and a pinch of cinnamon and curry, this Healthy Sweet Potato Butternut Casserole wows everyone! www.thecafesucrefarine.com

Combining roasted sweet potatoes and butternut squash, it comes together quickly, once the veggies finish their stint in the oven. This dish will be sure to bring rave reviews, as it allows the wonderful natural flavors of the veggies to shine without adding sugar.

Combining sweet potatoes, butternut squash, maple syrup and a pinch of cinnamon and curry, this Healthy Sweet Potato Butternut Casserole wows everyone! www.thecafesucrefarine.com

The ingredient cast list also includes, salt, pepper and a splash of maple syrup. In addition, there’s a pinch of both cinnamon and curry powder. Don’t worry, if you’re not a curry fan. The small amount of curry just adds a warm deliciousness when combined with the cinnamon. No one will be able to quite put their finger on the fabulous flavor. They’ll just know they love it!

The topping is my Maple Molasses Glazed Pecans with a scatter of fresh rosemary. If you haven’t tried these pecans yet, you might want to make a double batch!

Combining sweet potatoes, butternut squash, maple syrup and a pinch of cinnamon and curry, this Healthy Sweet Potato Butternut Casserole wows everyone! www.thecafesucrefarine.com

Why? Because, if you pop one in your mouth, it will be impossible to stop nibbling. And they make wonderful little appetizers with a glass of wine.

Combining sweet potatoes, butternut squash, maple syrup and a pinch of cinnamon and curry, this Healthy Sweet Potato Butternut Casserole wows everyone! www.thecafesucrefarine.com

To make your life easier, make this healthy sweet potato casserole a day in advance. Just cover and keep the pecans separate till just before baking. It also reheats well for those wonderful leftover Thanksgiving meals.

Combining sweet potatoes, butternut squash, maple syrup and a pinch of cinnamon and curry, this Healthy Sweet Potato Butternut Casserole wows everyone! www.thecafesucrefarine.com

What does your “typical” Thanksgiving meal include? I know it’s wonderful. If you have a minute and live in the U.S. or Canada, we’d love to hear how you celebrate this beautiful holiday. Feel free to leave a comment below. And finally, if you want to add a fabulous new dish to your holiday table, be sure to try this healthy sweet potato casserole!

For your Pinning pleasure!

Combining sweet potatoes, butternut squash, maple syrup and a pinch of cinnamon and curry, this Healthy Sweet Potato Butternut Casserole wows everyone! www.thecafesucrefarine.com

Lots of people ask what kind of cookware, small appliances, cutlery, etc. I use in the kitchen.  Here’s what I used to make this recipe.

Print

Healthy Sweet Potato Butternut Casserole

Combining sweet potatoes, butternut squash, maple syrup and a pinch of cinnamon and curry, this healthy sweet potato casserole wows everyone!

Combining sweet potatoes, butternut squash, maple syrup and a pinch of cinnamon and curry, this Healthy Sweet Potato Butternut Casserole wows everyone!

  • Author:
  • Yield: 6-8
  • Category: Side

Ingredients

  • 1 recipe Maple Molasses Glazed Pecans*, roughly chop the pecans before proceeding with the recipe
  • 3 medium sweet potatoes, about 2 pounds, halved
  • 1 large butternut squash, 2 1/2-3 pounds, cut in half**
  • 4 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • ½ teaspoon curry powder
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • 2 tablepoons pure maple syrup
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 teaspoons finely chopped fresh rosemary

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400˚F. Line two sheet pans with foil for easy clean up. Lightly grease a 8×8-inch baking dish.
  2. Add halved sweet potatoes to one baking sheet and the halved butternut squash** to the other. Drizzle the veggies on each pan with 2 teaspoons of olive oil and rub with your hands to coat.
  3. Roast butternut squash for 30 minutes, then add pan with sweet potatoes to the oven and bake for another 30-35 minutes or until both the squash and the sweet potatoes are very tender.
  4. Remove from oven and set aside to cool for about 10 minutes. Reduce oven heat to 350 degrees F.
  5. Holding sweet potato halves with a clean, folded kitchen towel or a pot holder, scoop the flesh of all the potatoes into a large bowl and discard the skin. Scoop out the seeds from the butternut squash and discard, then scoop out the flesh and add to the bowl with the sweet potatoes.
  6. Add the salt, pepper, curry powder, cinnamon, maple syrup and butter. Mash with a potato masher or an electric mixer until smooth. Transfer mixture to prepared baking dish and top with 1 1/2 cups of the Maple Molasses Glazed Pecans (you will have more pecans than you need, but they are great for nibbling). Bake for 15 minutes until hot. Sprinkle with finely chopped fresh rosemary. Serve and enjoy!

Notes

*You’ll have more pecans than you need for this recipe, but they keep well if stored in an airtight container. They’re perfect for sprinkling on puddings, ice creams and stirring into your morning yogurt.
** Butternut squash can be a real pain to cut as they are so… hard and dense. If you pop the whole squash in the microwave for 2-3 minutes, it will be much easier to cut. Remove it with a oven mit or pot holder as it will be hot. Give it a few minutes to cool, then slice off the hard stem at the top of the squash. Lay squash on it’s side and, with a long, sharp knife, starting at the top end, cut down the middle of the squash to the center. Do the same thing, starting from the other end. Your cuts should meet in the center and the squash will be cut in half. For this recipe, don’t work about scooping out the seeds at this point. It will be much easier to remove seeds after the squash is roasted and it’s nice and soft.

 



45 thoughts on “Healthy Sweet Potato Butternut Casserole”

  • Hi there! First, let me complement you on all of your amazing recipes.! Your blog is the first one that I go to when I am looking for a recipe! I would like to serve this butternut and sweet potato casserole on Christmas Eve but I will have limited space in my oven. My question is this — how do you think this casserole would stand up to being prepared the day before (without the pecans) and then reheated in the microwave? Thanks so much for your reply!

  • This looks great — so much luscious flavor! And it’s gorgeous! I love all the different Thanksgiving traditions people have. We do try to cook a new dish or two each year, but have some favorites that just have to be on the table. Fun post — thanks. And Happy Thanksgiving!

  • the textures must be so yummy together and all the flavours of thanksgiving. Another delicious recipe and great photography xoxo

  • This Midwest gal can relate, too—Indiana tends to have some southern tendencies, but my thoughts of a traditional Thanksgiving menu is more like what you grew up with. Now I love to try anything and everything. And a new, healthy side is especially welcome! Have a fabulous Thanksgiving, Chris and Scott, in case I don’t get back before the holiday!

  • Chris, I am thinking of making these to take to my sister-in-laws, about 3 hours away. You show them served in bowls. Is that because they are a more runny consistency than the ones made with eggs? Do I need to take small bowls for serving?
    Wishing you Thanksgiving blessings!

    • Hi Libby! No, you don’t need bowls. I just love those blue and white bowls so I used them. The casserole would be just fine served on a plate with the other yummy Thanksgiving meal. Happy Thanksgiving to you and your family!

  • I agree Chris, sweet potatoes are even better without all the marshmallows on top. Your dish is a beauty and would look wonderful on any Thanksgiving table. . Have a wonderful holiday!!!!

  • Oh, that looks scrumptious, Chris! I could seriously live on sweet potatoes and most kinds of squash. My husband, on the other hand, won’t eat them as much as I’ve tried to coax him. At least my daughters are on my side 🙂 I love the seasonings in this dish and those pecans – Wowsers. Happy Thanksgiving to you and your family, Chris!

  • I come from an Italian, Irish, German, and Polish family in South Jersey and married a man from the Florida-Alabama boarder with DEEP Southern roots. We’ve hosted each year since we got engaged. Our Thanksgiving spread includes turkey, stuffing (bread, sausage, Granny Smith apples, celery, and onions), homemade cranberry sauce, green bean casserole, pineapple casserole, corn pudding, roasted Brussels sprouts, deviled eggs, and rolls. The pineapple casserole is what got me into my mother-in-law’s good graces that first year. We’ve never had sweet potato casserole on our table, because my husband doesn’t like the super sweet version his aunts always made. I think I’ll try this version this year!

    • They are such a tradition in a number of parts of the country Debra, but I’m with you. Scott and I are both trying to be intentional about the amount of sugar we take in. Of course, that doesn’t mean we can’t have an occasional splurge!

  • I have come to learn that there are definitely regional differences when it comes to Thanksgiving. Canada’s is very much British influenced, so needless to say, I’ve never experienced cornbread stuffing or sweet potatoes with marshmallows. This dish would fit in perfectly though. Putting on the menu for next year 🙂

  • Oh my yum!! This looks so delicious, Chris! And a splash of maple syrup always makes things extra special 🙂
    I love discovering new holiday traditions around the country and so glad you shared some here. It’s much the same in Canada – across our vast land people choose some very different dishes for the holiday.
    Have a wonderful Thanksgiving with your family! 🙂

  • How exciting to see someone mention sauerkraut and Thanksgiving together. It’s our Maryland tradition which my new Pennsylvania neighbors really frown at. They don’t understand how the mild turkey and gravy are a perfect foil for the tangy flavor of sauerkraut. Pile in over your mashed potatoes and pour the gravy on!

  • I haven’t served a traditional Thanksgiving since my young adulthood but I do cook a small turkey for the leftovers and broth I make from the skin, bones and bits of meat; also making gray from the drippings. If I make dressing (or stuffing) I make it from scratch with my homemade bread cubes, broth and various vegetables. Since I don’t like marshmallows or excessively sweet dishes I usually bake the sweet potatoes/yams and serve mashed.
    Definitely trying this recipe so have the squash/yams baking now as I want to try the recipe before Thanksgiving. I’m substituting black walnuts for the pecans since pecans are not grown locally. I try to source all my food locally but we don’t raise sweet potatoes/yams in Idaho because of water, soil and storage issues but I love them so will buy as they are become available.
    Thanks for your recipes–I love trying new dishes.

  • We have to have home made egg noodles in the turkey gravey. Then pile that on top of mashed potatoes and top it off with corn. Now that we all have families of our own, our family tradition continues on with an egg noodles maker in each family. We are Dutch descendants…..and probably all a little over weight after all this!!

    • Haha! Thanks for sharing this Sally. So very interesting! I’ve never heard of home made egg noodles in gravy before. What feast you have 🙂 And we all probably carry a few pounds after the holidays!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


503 Shares
Pin
+1
Share
Tweet
Stumble
Yum