Pork and Chorizo Chili w/ Black Beans and Black-eyed Peas

Pork and Chorizo Chili with Black Beans and Black-eyed Peas - In the south, they say that eating black-eyed peas on New Years will bring you good luck. Not so sure about that but I do know that this chili is a delicious way to celebrate any day of the year!

I’m thinking, after making this delicious chili, that perhaps I’ve finally “arrived”!

Pork and Chorizo Chili with Black Beans and Black-eyed Peas - In the south, they say that eating black-eyed peas on New Years will bring you good luck. Not so sure about that but I do know that this chili is a delicious way to celebrate any day of the year!

Well, maybe not “arrived”, but at least taken one more step toward being an authentic, genuine, bonafide Southerner!! You see, I grew up and spent my young adulthood in the northernmost reaches of midwestern United States. When we moved to the Southeast thirty years ago, I realized that there were tons of customs and traditions that I’d never heard of, figures of speech that I’d no clue as to the meaning of and crazy things these wonderful folks ate that I’d never dreamed people actually consumed – all this…. and I never even left the good old U.S.A.!

Over the years I have taken on more and more “Southernisms” and this year I have succumbed to yet another; a widespread tradition that involves welcoming the New Year with black-eyed peas. Black-eyed peas?!?!? Yes, according to Southern folklore dating back to the Civil War, consuming black-eyed peas on New Years Day is supposed to bring luck, health and wealth. While we’re not believers in “luck”, (only God’s good, sweet grace)  I think traditions are fun and I’ve discovered that black-eyed peas are quite delicious!

While this chili is actually quite versatile – you can really add whatever type of beans you have on hand or prefer – I decided on black beans and black-eyed peas. It’s a very hearty chili with lot’s of shredded pork loin (leftover from one of our holiday meals) and chorizo sausage, a seasoned sausage that is common in Spanish and Mexican cuisine. Thick, meaty, loaded with smokey fire-roasted tomatoes and wonderful spices and herbs,yum! Aafter our first few bites, Scott and I deemed it most definitely blog worthy!

Pork and Chorizo Chili with Black Beans and Black-eyed Peas - In the south, they say that eating black-eyed peas on New Years will bring you good luck. Not so sure about that but I do know that this chili is a delicious way to celebrate any day of the year!

I like to serve this Pork and Chorizo Chili w/ Black Beans and Black-eyed Peas with tortilla chips,  a dollop of sour cream and a mound of salsa. It was delicious today with the Granny Smith Apple and Avocado Salsa but Dulce’s Mexican Sauce, Fire-Roasted Salsa with Fresh Corn and Pineapple or your own favorite salsa would be equally delicious!

Pork and Chorizo Chili with Black Beans and Black-eyed Peas - In the south, they say that eating black-eyed peas on New Years will bring you good luck. Not so sure about that but I do know that this chili is a delicious way to celebrate any day of the year!

This is a wonderful way to use up leftover pork roast or pork chops. I love a yummy pork roast dinner, but I’m not crazy about it rewarmed and served as leftovers. This delicious recipe takes leftovers to a fabulous new level! Oh, and by the way, this chili freezes just beautifully – I’m saving some to break out on New Year’s Day,who knows? I might just start talking with a sweet Southern drawl one of these days, y’all! 🙂

Pork and Chorizo Chili with Black Beans and Black-eyed Peas - In the south, they say that eating black-eyed peas on New Years will bring you good luck. Not so sure about that but I do know that this chili is a delicious way to celebrate any day of the year!

Pork and Chorizo Chili w/ Black Beans and Black-eyed Peas

Ingredients:
16-18 ounces chorizo*, casings removed
2 medium onion, diced
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons kosher salt
6 cloves garlic, minced
1 tablespoon cumin
1-3 teaspoons chili powder** –  start out with 1 or 2 and add more to taste, I have ruined a whole pot of chili by adding too much and getting it too spicy for our taste
2 tablespoons dried oregano
¼ cup brown sugar
½ cup minced fresh cilantro
1 12 ounce bottle dark ale or brown ale beer, I used New Castle
4 15-ounce cans diced, fire-roasted canned tomatoes puréed, undrained
3 15 ounce can black beans***, drained and rinsed
3 15 ounce can black-eyed peas***, drained and rinsed
2 4 ounce cans green chiles
1-2 pounds leftover pork loin roast or pork chops****, depending on how “meaty” you like your chili (or how much leftover pork you have), cut into 2 inch slices
½ cup minced fresh cilantro

Directions:
1. Heat 1 tablespoon of oil in a large dutch oven until hot. Crumble the chorizo into pot and cook over medium-high heat. Cook, stirring frequently, until lightly browned about 3-4 minutes. Add the onion and 1 teaspoon salt. Cook, stirring frequently, about 5 minutes, or until onions are softened. Stir in the garlic and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Remove pot from heat and drain off most of the fat. (I just tilt the pot, push the meat to one side and let the grease drain away from the meat mixture. I take several thicknesses of paper towel and soak up the grease.) Add the flour and stir for several minutes until incorporated.

2. Add the salt, garlic, cumin, chili powder, oregano, brown sugar, first 1/2 cup of cilantro, beer, tomatoes, black beans, black-eyed peas, green chilies, and sliced pork. Stir well to combine and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium-low and cover. Simmer for 1½-2 hours or until pork is tender. Remove pork from pot and set aside to cool for about 30 minutes. In the meantime continue to simmer chili, uncovered – it will become a bit thicker as the extra liquid evaporates. When meat is cool enough to handle shred meat into bite sized pieces with two forks or fingers and return to pot. Stir in the cilantro and season with salt and pepper to taste.
Serve with tortilla chips, a dollop of sour cream and a scoop of salsa, if desired.

Adapted from The Best Make-Ahead Recipe – Cook’s Illustrated

This recipe makes a TON! It freezes beautifully but if you don’t want to make such a large batch, just cut it in half – you’ll still have a nice sized pot of chili!

Notes:
* Chorizo is a seasoned sausage that is common in Mexican and Spanish cuisine. In the past, it was a often difficult to find without access to a Hispanic grocery. Nowadays most larger markets carry chorizo. I really like the Johnsonville brand which is quite readily available nationwide, and is fairly low in fat.
** Chili powders can vary immensely in flavor and intensity so always start off judiciously and add more, to taste.
*** This recipe is very versatile – if you prefer other types of beans, feel free to substitute!
**** If you don’t have left-over pork you could substitute 1-2 pounds of pork tenderloin for the pork loin/chops. Add the uncooked pork tenderloin to the tomato/bean mixture in step 2. Check the pork after about an hour of cooking time – it won’t take as long to become tender.


18 thoughts on “Pork and Chorizo Chili w/ Black Beans and Black-eyed Peas”

  • He, he, I thought that you told me to always send the excess beer your way – the UPS man should have it on his truck now, did I do wrong?

  • LOL, my aunt Ruby taught me about the New Year’s luck tradition of eating BEP on new year’s day. This is a very creative way to do it! And you know, I bet you already have a little drawl and don’t even know it. It can sneak up on you! 🙂

  • What did you do with the rest of the beer.
    I use to buy a cup of beer from my neighbor in Henderson for beer battered onion rings. He was alway delighted to sell a cup to me so he could drink the rest before it went to waste. The chili looks so good – I could even watch a football game with a pot of chili like
    that on the stove. Welcome to the south. Don’t forget to eat your greens and cornbread:-)
    love and hugs, geenie

  • This would surely have healing powers! And, I always cook black eye peas for the New Year. There was also a tradition of putting a dime in the bottom of the pot for prosperity. I always pass on that one.

  • I don’t think this northerner has ever eaten black eyed peas, but this sounds like a great dish to try them out! It sounds like an amazing version of chili…with the pork and chorizo! YUM!

  • Hey Chris, Do you know about putting a penny in the beans? Maybe it’s just a Texas thing. Who ever finds the penny in the pot of black-eyed peas has the most “luck” although I’m with you about luck.

  • This sounds wonderful. I had never heard of the whole good luck and black eyed pea thing until I started food blogging. What an interesting tradition, however it led you to this chili recipe that sounds freakin’ amazing. Beautiful photos.

  • Your note on chorizo made me chuckle. The chorizo available in the Hispanic grocery stores in Texas has a less-than-appetizing ingredient list (in terms of parts of the pig)! I think I’ll stick with Johnsonville (which I love, too)!

  • We spent Christmas in Santa Fe and are already planning next trip. This dish will help us remember our great holiday AND help us ring in New Year’s Eve. Sounds like an excellent recipe! Thank YOU!

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